Independence 1776

This bold song appeared in the “Freeman’s Journal,” about one mouth previous to the declaration of independence, as a “Parody on an ode published in the Town and Country Magazine,” in 1774. The loyal papers of the time speak of it as a specimen of “high-born rebel melody.” There is a low and vulgar parody on this song, in a collection of “Fugitive Pieces,” published at London in 1777.

INDEPENDENCE.

Tune: unknown
FREEMEN ! if you pant for glory,
If you sigh to live in story,
If you burn with patriot zeal;
Seize this bright auspicious hour,
Chase those venal tools of power,
Who subvert the public weal.

Huzza! Huzza! Huzza!
See Freedom her banner display,
Whilst glory and virtue your bosoms inspire,
Corruption’s proud slaves shall with anguish retire.

Would traitors base with bribes beguile you,
Or with idiot scoffs revile you,
Ne’er your sacred trusts betray;
Hancock, Adams, nobly pleading,
Never from the truth receding,
Them, North’s vengeance can’t dismay.

See, their glorious path pursuing,
All Britannia’s troops subduing,
Patriots whom no threats restrain.
Lawless tyrants all confounding,
Future times their praise resounding,
Shall their triumphs long maintain.

1 Freeman’s Journal. Among the newspapers foremost in support of the cause of the colonies, the “Freeman’s Journal, or New Hampshire Gazette,” published at Portsmouth, took a most decided and fearless position. No number of that paper appeared during that “well-tried contest,” without some urgent appeal, filled with hope and encouragement for those who were struggling for their “rights and religion;” and its editors were ever faithful to their trusts and principles; never faltering to upbraid and oppose all who entertained any sympathy or affection for the British Government.

Contributed by Ron Feathers.

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